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  • Step Inside Love, one person exhibition, domobaal, London, 2015

Talbot, Emma, 2016, Show, Exhibition or Event, Step Inside Love, one person exhibition, domobaal, London, 2015

Abstract or Description:

Exhibition included 5 large scale paintings on canvas, single drawings and two 3-dimensional pieces 'Intangible Things:Ghost' and 'Intangible Things:Dream'. 5 paintings from this exhibition were subsequently exhibited at AGWA, Perth, Australia in 2016.

Emma Talbot's practice explores an idiosyncratic universe where fiction, real life and memory freely interact; her meticulous fluid brushwork fills canvas and paper with recurring themes, ornaments, figures, architecture, interwoven with meandering tendrils. The paintings and drawings are intense and rich in detail, supporting an almost extravagant image–world.

The large format paintings on canvas are broken up by small discrete windows revealing certain key episodes. Small format stories, images and text fragments in no particular order are loosely connected together leaving empty spaces by which means Talbot invites the viewer in, to fill and complement the overall visual experience. In the ongoing series of three–dimensional forms 'Intangible Things', presented in both exhibitions, Talbot's approach to drawing is extended into the material properties of fabric and papie–mâché. She uses the language of the hand–made with immediacy, to give psychologically driven thoughts and ideas a physical presence.

Literature, both contemporary and classical as well as poetry and song lyrics provide inspiration in Talbot's practice, as do Japanese Shunga, Metaphysical Poetry, Edna O'Brien, Anaïs Nin, Pablo Neruda and Paul Ricœur.

Individual scenes are developed further in running ornamentation or placed in geometrical compositions. The artist obscures the identity of her protagonists by offering anonymised faces. Missing walls or empty spaces in exquisite exotic carpets give the viewer literal access to the hidden secret world of the unconscious.

Text fragments introduce their own idiosyncratic typography and are reminiscent of religious texts, comic books or perhaps just notes written in the margin of schoolbooks. These notes on their own – separated from accompanying images – become a commentary on the life lived and the deliberate spelling out of these notes develop into a visual language that is strangely life–affirming.

Official URL: https://www.domobaal.com/exhibitions/82-15-emma-ta...
Subjects: Creative Arts and Design > W100 Fine Art
School or Centre: School of Fine Art
Funders: domobaal, London
Date Deposited: 19 Mar 2018 15:40
Last Modified: 19 Mar 2018 15:40
URI: http://researchonline.rca.ac.uk/id/eprint/3314

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